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Showing posts from 2021

Challenge Square No. 14: Linen Stitch in two colors

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  Needles: US 8 Yarn: Caron Simply Soft Eco Color A: Woodland, Color B: Greenfields The linen stitch is a simple knit stitch alternating with as slipped stitch where the yarn is held in front so that it wraps around the slipped stitch. The linen stitch can be done in all one color BUT to get this fun checkered effect two different colors can be used and are worked every two rows. I worked this square flat on straight needles and added a simple knit stitch on the first and last stitch to create somewhat of an edge. It requires an even number of stitches. Row 1 (RS): *K1, slip 1 with yarn in front, rep from * to end Row 2 (WS): *P1, slip 1 with yarn in back, rep from * to end So for two colors you would work row 1 and 2 in color A, then work row 1 and 2 again with color B. Each time switching colors just twist the yarn up the side of the work. I love the look of this stitch! It makes for a tighter stitch so the rows are shorter but it makes the knitting feel more dense and has the fun wr

A Swatch Guide and the Importance of a Good Gauge

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I've been experimenting with some different yarn types lately and have been really intrigued with mohair and merino wool knit together using a technique called "double stranding" where the two yarns are held together and knit as if they are one. To see my swatch, make sure to check out my post Knitting with two strands of yarn - mohair and merino . As much as I love to dive right into a knit project, it is very important to get a sample swatch knit first and make sure that the gauge matches the pattern. What is a gauge you ask? And how do you use it? Let me tell you what I know and convince you to always knit a swatch and calculate your gauge before starting any knit project! What is a gauge swatch?    How to do a good gauge swatch Depending on the yarn you are working with, you will use the recommended needle size and determine how many stitches to cast on in order to get a 4" by 4" square. The label should provide some gauge for suggested needle size for eith

Knitting in the round versus working flat, what’s the difference?

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If you've been following my projects at all you can tell that I absolutely LOVE knitting in the round and ever since I started constructing sweaters from the top down knit in the round, I have never gone back to flat pieces sewn together. Working a project in the round allows for no seams so when you bind off , you have hardly any finishing to do! Plus you can try on as you go to make sure it will fit. Working flat is a more traditional method and allows you to work with small pieces at a time then put them all together so you don't have a gigantic clothing item on your needles you have to constantly turn and knit. There are certainly a lot of pros to working in the round. Regardless of what construction I'm doing, when I start a project I have been creating a flat gauge swatch (at least I try to be good and knit a gauge swatch, but it doesn't always happen...) It had never occurred to me that I should be doing a gauge in the round if I'm going to be working that

My First Time Trying Colorwork!

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The Princess Tee in Color Since knitting the princess tee for Violet in time for her first birthday at the end of February, she has had a growth spurt and no longer fit into the original 12 month size I made for her. 😢 Ah, the trouble with baby knits. You spend time making them and they only wear them 4-5 times before they grow out of it... Because I love the sweater tee so much, I wanted to make it for her again in a larger size. So I hunted around my stash for more of that beautiful Capretta yarn from Knit Picks and I found several skeins in the Neon edition from a sale we went to about a year ago.  The tubular turquoise is a fun bright and light color, great for spring. The blueberry blast is a classic royal blue (which is one of my favorite colors). I had a tough time deciding what color to knit the princess tee in and decided to use both! The color combination is actually beautiful, and I could try some colorwork knitting for the first time ever. What better excuse to learn a ne

Knitting with two strands of yarn - mohair and merino

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Interested in knitting with two strands of yarn? There are two ways to knit with two strands of yarn. The first would be holding the two strands together as if they were one, called "double stranding" or double-stranded knitting. The other way would be alternating knit rows with the different types of yarn, switching yarn within the project. I've recently seen lots of knitwear pop up with both of these methods of knitting with two yarn types, and especially yarn of different weights. I'm loving the look of mohair knit together with a merino wool, seen in lots of patterns lately for sweaters that look extra fuzzy and soft but still have structure and warmth. (Check out this balloon sweater from Petit Knit using mohair and merino wool knit two strands together). I've also seen the yarn knit separately in different parts of a project, such as mohair for light fluffy sleeves on a structured merino wool bodice. See the beautiful shawl below that combines different sect

Challenge Square No. 13: Chenille tuft insertion

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  Needles: US 8 Yarn: Caron Simply Soft Eco in natural The chenille tuft insertion is in the bobble section but is shown as an edging option. The bobbles create a diamond along the edge, so for my sample square I used the diamonds along the top and side edges as well. The tuft is made by knitting into the next stitch without dropping the base stitch from needle, slip the new stitch back to left hand needle and knit into it again. Once you've done this 4 times, you pass each of those knit stitches over the first stitch. This bobble was very easy once I got the rhythm down. See this video that shows exactly how to make the tuft stitch- I like the way this turned out, the diamond shape is cute! I can see how this could be used on edging for a bulky knit cardigan or even the edges of a baby blanket. This could also be fun on a scarf or shawl. I will say I liked this bobble better than the berry rib as it was easy working with one stitch at a time as they were passed over instead of ha

Repurposing new yarn from old sweater (continued)

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Previously I shared that I no longer liked an old sweater of mine and thought "hey, I bet I could repurpose that yarn into something fun that I love!" I took the plunge and ripped apart aka frogged my 10 year old cotton sweater and wound up all the yarn. It was actually a very satisfying feeling, you can read all about it here "5 lessons I learned while frogging my sweater" . Out with the Old I've been brainstorming ways to use the old/new yarn and settled on a tank top that could also be a sweater vest. Cotton yarn can be difficult to knit with because it is actually a very heavy fiber. It can cause your item to droop in ways you don't want. I had knit the previous sweater in stockinette stitch in a smaller needle size so it was too compressed and felt very heavy. And there is NO STRETCH in plain cotton! If you want stretch in your finished item you need to use ribbing. For my tank design I used several changes to help improve the use of the yarn. 1. I used

Challenge Square No. 12: Berry Rib

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Berry Rib  Needles: US 8 Yarn: Caron Simply Soft Eco These bobbles are HUGE! They are made by doing several knit 1 then yarn overs and turning the work. This was not easy to do and as you can see the swatch I made has a lot of them. Phew I was glad to get this one done. I will say the payoff is nice with the large bobbles, they look really good.  This is titled a rib and it definitely behaves like one. The swatch totally "shrank" in on me, I had to try to stretch it a bit to get a good photo. There are 4 rows repeating and the bobble is done on row 3. The other rows are K3 P3 rib so it's no surprise that it gave me that ribbing stretch.  I think if I were to use this in a design I'm not sure I would do so many rows and columns, there are an overwhelming amount of bobbles here. This could be really fun on a throw pillow or an all around boarder on a blanket where only one or two bobble rows are used. What other suggestions do you have for use of the berry rib stitch?

The Princess Tee - a spring toddler puff sleeve sweater

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The Princess Tee *** Pattern Release *** I've finalized the toddler sweater pattern while working with a test knit and second pair of eyes editing my document and it's finally ready for purchase! I'm so excited to share this adorable sweater with you all, I'm really proud of this pattern and design. The puff sleeves turned out exactly as I imagined they would and I love the placket in the back to allow the sweater to be easily pulled on over a child's head. To see the basic steps I used to construct the sweater, make sure to check out my previous post, Puff sleeve toddler sweater construction . The snap tape I used in the back placket is from Joann's or online Dritz snap tape . I obviously used black for this sweater, but you can also get white. Yarn: Knit Picks Capretta Superwash in Pinot Heather (fingering 80% Fine Superwash Merino 10% cashmere 10% Nylon)  Needles: US Size 3 circular and double pointed needles This yarn, let me tell you, it is so soft and li